Pre-Listing Inspections: Myths & Facts

Reluctant to get your home inspected before you list it for sale? Don’t believe the myths. Proper use of a pre-listing inspection can reduce your stress and avoid potential delays in the closing process.

Myth:  I will need to fix the problems with the house in the pre-listing inspection report before I can sell it.

Fact:  There may be items in the report that you wish to address. Typically, the best course of action is to disclose the report to any prospective buyers.  Once this information is in the hands of the buyer, no further disclosure should be necessary.  We always encourage prospective buyers to contact us regarding the pre-listing report.

Myth:  Buyers will be put off by the information in the report.

Truth:  The buyers will get the information one way or the other. It’s much better addressing it upfront. Waiting until the buyers bring it up on a reply to inspection with a list of demands, puts you at a disadvantage. Buyers often demand compensation or repairs that may be unreasonable.

Myth:  The buyers will hire their own inspector who will find a new list.

Fact:  We feel every buyer should have an inspector represent them. We offer buyers the opportunity to have one of our inspectors walk through the property with them for half the original inspection fee.  This is not a reinspection; we are simply showing them the house, walking them through the report, and answering their questions. If they do hire a different company and there are significant discrepancies, we will review and comment on them.

Myth:  The information in the report will increase my exposure.

Truth:  The report will limit your exposure. You have gone above-and-beyond by having your own inspection. You will still need to accurately complete the seller’s disclosure.

Myth:  Pre-listing inspections are expensive.

Truth:  They cost no more than a typical inspection. The value in having a buyer under contract that already knows the home’s flaws is invaluable.  

If there are substantial problems uncovered by the pre-listing inspection process, you can deal with it on you own terms.  If substantial issues become apparent in a typical inspection, the buyer could terminate the deal, or ask for compensation/repairs that may be unreasonable.

BILL

Bill Dare

Owner, Spotlight Home Inspection, LLC